Blog

Taking Care of Young Children with Diabetes

Seeing a loved one experience discomfort is always difficult—but to see a young child be diagnosed with a lifelong condition is even harder. For parents learning their child has type 1 diabetes, the news can be crushing, but it doesn’t have to be. While type 1 diabetes is a lifelong condition, advances in treatment options have made managing it easier than ever before. 

Image of a child with type 1 diabetes, formerly known as juvenile diabetes.

The Difference Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

There’s been an increasing amount of discussion surrounding the growing levels of sugar in our food and how it relates to the obesity epidemic. Frequently, these statistics are paired with the rising rate of diabetes across the country.

But what does that mean?

According to the American Diabetes Association, 29.1 million people had either type 1 or type 2 diabetes in 2012—that’s nearly 10 percent of the population! However, many of these people went undiagnosed because they didn’t know the warning signs. Today we’re going to talk about both types of diabetes and their differences so that you can catch the symptoms early.

Image of a diabetic. Contact a local endocrinologist to talk about diabetes.

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention Tips

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes in America. According to the American Diabetes Association, more than 20 million Americans had type 2 diabetes in 2012. Unfortunately, the numbers seem to be on the rise. However, unlike type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes isn’t necessarily a lifelong condition. In some cases, you can control type 2 diabetes with diet, exercise, and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. 

Image of a glucometer. Contact a local physician about diabetes prevention tips.

5 Steps to Easy, Gluten-Free Dining

Do you know what’s allowed and what’s not allowed when you're on a gluten-free diet? 

A gluten-free diet is the treatment for celiac disease. Celiac disease is an immune reaction to eating gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley and rye. If you have celiac disease you probably have a general understanding of what’s OK to eat and what you should avoid. 

That is, until you go to a restaurant.  

Restaurants are getting better at offering gluten-free options (some even have gluten-free menus). But, if there isn't a specific menu, we wanted to share these tips to help make dining out gluten-free easier and less stressful. 

If you (or someone in your family) is just starting a gluten-free diet, it’s a good idea to consult a dietitian who can answer your questions and offer advice about how to avoid gluten while still eating a healthy, balanced diet. 

image of gluten free muffins

5 Steps to Easy, Gluten-Free Dining